Oh shit

Oh shit

Step one: removing broken neck.

Step one: removing broken neck.

Gluing up the neck.  It reset perfectly.

Gluing up the neck. It reset perfectly.

Removing the top.

Removing the top.

dismantling $300 of electrics 
(they still work - yeay)

dismantling $300 of electrics (they still work - yeay)

Open heart surgery

Open heart surgery

The new cedar top.  Made from an old boat seat.
Wood like this is very hard to come by but there it was sitting in the corner of my workshop - waiting.

The new cedar top. Made from an old boat seat. Wood like this is very hard to come by but there it was sitting in the corner of my workshop - waiting.

Adding new curfing to the sides (the new top will be glued on to these pieces)

Adding new curfing to the sides (the new top will be glued on to these pieces)

I'm smiling because I love working on my guitar - it brings me great peace.  But I don't think I would feel this way at all if my luthier friend James wasn't guiding and helping me through.

This photo doesn't really reveal anything of the complexity that had just happened.  A 5" section at the back of the guitar was smashed up quite badly and the wood was buckled.  There are many other clamps inside the guitar that you can't see here - this glue up took about an hour and we scavenged bracing from the old top to bring the cracks back into an even plane.